ACEF 2019 Call for Abstracts

(Now Closed)

Thank you for your submissions.

About the Thematic Tracks at ACEF 2019

Each year in June, clean energy professionals from around the world [1] convene at the headquarters of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in Manila to attend the Asia Clean Energy Forum (ACEF) and discuss the progress, status, and prospects for clean energy in the Asia region. For ACEF 2019, we are making a significant change in the way we approach the technical discussions at ACEF, based on the cross-cutting approach outlined in ADB’s new Strategy 2030. The strategy focuses on the following key operational priorities:

Priorities in ADB’s Strategy 2030

  • Addressing remaining poverty and reducing inequalities
  • Accelerating progress in gender equality
  • Tackling climate change, building climate and disaster resilience, and enhancing environmental sustainability
  • Making cities more livable
  • Promoting rural development and food security
  • Strengthening governance and institutional capacity
  • Fostering regional cooperation and integration

For more information regarding ADB’s Strategy 2030, please click here.

ACEF 2019 Theme: Partnering for Impact

The theme for ACEF 2019 is “Partnering for Impact”, as we want to highlight and focus on collaborative partnerships and efforts that are market-facing, with the aim to deliver tangible development impacts. We have developed the following set of five Thematic Tracks based on the ADB’s Strategy 2030’s key operational priorities:

  • Energy and Livable Cities
  • Energy and Water Sustainability
  • Energy and Rural Poverty Alleviation
  • Energy and Innovative Finance
  • Clean Energy Trends and Directions

We would like the sessions to highlight innovations in technologies, policies, or approaches, and to showcase how collaboration is important in order to drive and accelerate the growth of the clean energy sector across other key sectors throughout Asia.

Guidance for Development of Abstracts

The ACEF program is developed based on submission of abstracts targeted at specific, predefined clean energy topics, organized into five streams (the Thematic Tracks). Submissions should be based on successful (or in some cases unsuccessful!) experiences in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of clean energy, energy access, and cross sectoral projects and initiatives.

Broadly speaking, we encourage submission of abstracts that are more practical than theoretical, and that cover innovations in technology and energy systems. Abstracts can cover new and proven approaches to policy development through both private and public sector collaboration; investment and financing opportunities that help drive the market; community and grassroots initiatives; creative business models and approaches that are gaining traction in Asia; and detailed case studies of best practices and lessons learned throughout the energy and related sectors in Asia.

For more information about ACEF, you can sign up to receive updates from our newsletter or you can also follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and on Facebook. If you have any questions, please contact us at acef@adb.org

By 2030, nearly 2.5 billion people will be living in cities across Asia. Such an intensive level of urban growth will present a range of challenges, such as increased demand for transportation, housing, and energy. It will also offer a huge opportunity to identify and implement effective mechanisms to improve environmental sustainability in cities, and to provide a high quality of life to citizens.

This track will highlight approaches and solutions that make cities more climate-resilient and livable by incorporating more flexible, low-carbon, clean energy systems, and approaches into urban development.

Topics will include, but are not limited to, integration of smart design and renewable energy into the built urban environment, alternatives to petroleum-based public and private transportation, urban microgrids, and urban planning and energy integration that can offer to cities and urban communities a range of social, environmental, and climate change benefits. Case studies and examples of regional cooperation will be presented throughout the track.

Abstracts should address one of the topics listed below:

Cities, Session 1: Urban Energy Planning for Smarter Utilities

Cities require reliable energy for efficient water supply, waste water treatment, solid waste management, housing, logistics and other essential functions. This session will share forward-thinking views, industry insights and concrete examples of integration of renewable energy and energy efficiency within utilities, which could help cities address the emerging challenges with conventional and transformative technologies in the various urban forms.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What will be the role of the current urban utilities in the future energy landscape?
  • How can urban utilities that provide water supply, sanitation, waste management, and energy supply and distribution services better embrace new technologies with innovative thinking and business models?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Cities, Session 2: Scaling Up E-Mobility as a Sustainable Urban Transportation

The mobility of city residents and products in Asia today is largely dependent on petroleum fuels for powering road vehicles and other public transportation systems. This session aims to explore the potential for sustainable urban mobility and discuss various technological innovations, policy and regulatory support, attractive business models and financial structuring that can create an enabling environment for e-mobility.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are the key technical hurdles (fuel choices, electricity mix, distribution networks, smart charging, etc.) to integrating e-mobility into urban policies?
  • What are the mechanisms for supporting the expansion of sustainable urban mobility?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Cities, Session 3: Heating and Cooling for Buildings in Cities

The buildings sector is responsible for more than one-third of global final energy consumption. This session will highlight the essential role of heating and cooling in the energy profile of cities and will discuss technologies, systems, and strategies for moving toward low-carbon space conditioning of cities. Some of the topics covered will include energy efficient appliances, LED lighting, smart residential and commercial buildings technologies, health and safety impacts, and energy conservation building codes.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What policy and regulatory frameworks should be put in place for project developers and financiers to develop, and invest in, the next generation of urban energy infrastructure?
  • How can we assess the financial, technical, and economic viability of different district heating and cooling projects at sensible scales, and evaluate the trade-off of options in various urban forms and population densities?
  • What are the best practices in smart design (i.e.: solar passive) for low-carbon and energy-efficient residential and commercial buildings?
  • How can we effectively integrate super-efficient space cooling into smart buildings?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Cities, Session 4: New Energy Solutions: Multi-Benefit Opportunities for Cities

The World Health Organization (WHO) states that nearly 91% of the world’s population lives in places where air quality exceeds WHO guideline limits, leading to serious health issues and in some cases deaths. The session will highlight the range of social, environmental, health and safety and climate change benefits that new urban energy systems can offer to urban communities.

The session will address the following questions:

  • How can we accelerate energy access and energy choices up the “energy ladder” to account for the benefits of improved air and water quality, as well as bio-diversity impacts?
  • What are the health and safety benefits related to energy-efficiency improvements and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning replacement?
  • How can we create community awareness and engagement for collaboration and collective action on new energy solutions?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Cities, Session 5: Urban Microgrids

Cities in the future will not only consume more energy, but will also produce energy and be connected through microgrids. Urban microgrids will offer new services that are synergistic with and accelerate other urban energy solutions, such as smart metering and net metering in buildings, and electric vehicles. This session will discuss upcoming challenges and opportunities of the microgrid as a reliable, resilient and efficient urban energy system, and will include successful pilot cases in developing countries.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are the challenges (technology, regulation, and business models) faced by microgrid developers?
  • What are some practical and illustrative case studies that demonstrate the value brought by microgrids in different contexts?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Water is one of the most important natural resources that we have. However, the availability and quality of water has been significantly affected by population growth, increasing consumptive life styles, human mismanagement, and the impacts of climate change. It is essential to challenge the current isolated approaches to how we manage energy and water issues, and to strive for an integrated approach to plan for and accommodate the growing, often linked, demand for energy and water.

This track will focus on the multiple connections between water and energy, including the use of water in energy production systems such as hydropower, thermal power, off-shore wind power, floating solar PV and biofuels, as well as the use of energy in the provision of water and sanitation services. The session will take an integrated view of how to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 6 and SDG 7[2], and how to address the challenges posed by existing institutional structures, policies, and procedures at the subnational, national, regional, and global levels.

Topics will include, but are not limited to, the use of energy for water treatment and sanitation; for transport, delivery, and water pumping for residential use; and for irrigation in agriculture. Case studies and examples of regional cooperation will be presented throughout the track.

Abstracts should address one of the topics listed below:

Energy and Water, Session 1: Sustainable Energy Use for Water: Focusing on Water Supply and Sanitation

There is a critical need to properly address water supply and sanitation in Asia, as the lack of adequate waste management policies and infrastructure improvements is impacting many watersheds. This session will feature discussions on water treatment for water supply, and energy generation from waste, including biogas from sludge digestion.

The session will address the following questions:

  • How can we include energy savings through innovative technologies from ground water extraction and water transmission from water supply and sanitation?
  • How will future and current innovative technologies help address these issues by the introduction of renewable energy, such as solar PV for water treatment and extraction?
  • What are commercial and cost-effective systems and business models for turning wastewater into energy?
  • What are the business models that will help accelerate the circular economy of innovative energy-water projects that can provide access to affordable clean energy in both rural and urban areas?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy and Water, Session 2: Sustainable Energy Use for Water: Focusing on Irrigation Water

As populations continue to grow rapidly across Asia, it is important to discuss how to improve sustainable water irrigation and improve overall agriculture production in order to meet growing demand[3]. This session will focus on solar-based and grid powered irrigation and will highlight energy saving mechanisms for ground water pumping and water transmission, including efficient water use for irrigation.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are the opportunities to utilize solar-based energy and reduce energy use in grid powered irrigation?
  • What are the innovative business models that can help make solar based irrigation become mainstream?
  • How can we weight and prioritize the trade-offs of water use between food production and biofuel?
  • What are the economic impacts for rural communities?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy and Water, Session 3: Sustainable Water Use for Energy: Focusing on Hydropower, Offshore Wind, and Floating Solar PV

Water-based energy generation systems such as hydropower and floating solar PV offer great opportunities for the clean energy transition in Asia. This session will include deliberations on how we can scale up technologies such as floating solar PV, offshore wind farms, hydropower, and wave-power generation, supported through favorable policies, and delivered at competitive prices while minimizing environmental and social impacts.

The session will address the following questions:

  • How can we assess where to best deploy technology options to produce the most cost-effective power production?
  • How can we educate the public about the benefits from latest technology developments?
  • What are the economic benefits of various water-based energy generation systems, and how can we address job training?
  • How can private and public sector organizations and stakeholders leverage resources to attract additional financing?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy and Water, Session 4: Sustainable Water Use for Energy: Focusing on Thermal Power; Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage; and Geothermal Power

There is a close nexus between water and energy in power production at various stages of the process. This session will examine water utilization and the potential for savings in thermal and geothermal power production, and how to prevent water pollution in various stages of the fuel and groundwater supply chain. For geothermal generation, multi-purpose use of resources will also be considered.

The session will address the following questions:

  • How can we achieve the most environmentally and economically friendly mechanisms for water utilization throughout the power production process?
  • What regulations are needed to ensure the protection of water resources?
  • What is the impact of carbon capture utilization and storage for power generation, and how can this be managed?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Migration to urban areas resulting from overall economic growth across Asia has created a focus on development issues in urban centers at the expense of addressing poverty in rural communities. More than 400 million people across Asia lack access to electricity, especially in geographically remote rural areas, in fragile states, and in small island communities. , Due to their location and poor infrastructure, these rural communities, are more vulnerable to climate change related disasters and extreme weather events.

This track will highlight efforts to improve the quality of life and hasten economic growth in rural areas by increasing access to clean and modern energy services. The track will also cover efforts to improve financial inclusion for energy access through microfinance. One session will have a special focus on women and another on “Future Energy”.

Topics will include, but are not limited to, innovative end-user technologies and applications and energy efficient and climate-resilient infrastructure and practices, including planning for disasters and enhancing disaster preparedness and emergency responses. Case studies and examples of regional cooperation will be presented throughout the track.

Abstracts should address one of the topics listed below:

Energy and Poverty, Session 1: Planning and Building for Climate Resilience and Low-Carbon Growth

Asia’s rural populations—from remote mountainous regions to low-lying coastal communities in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) countries and Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations (FCAS)* —are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change: extreme weather events, drought, increased precipitation, rising sea levels, storm surges and coastal flooding. This session will look at mitigation and adaptation technologies, energy-efficient and climate-resilient building practices, green insurance products, and innovative motorized water transport for efficient evacuation in the wake of disasters.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are some innovative climate-resilient mitigation and adaptation technologies and practices, including for disaster preparedness and awareness?
  • How can we build climate-positive community organizations, strengthen core infrastructure, and create socio-technical structures to cope with and respond to emergencies?
  • What are the economic benefits, and what training is needed?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?
* Countries in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations include most (9 out of 14) of ADB’s Pacific Developing Member Countries, as well as Afghanistan, Nepal, and Myanmar. For more information see here.

Energy and Poverty, Session 2: Going Beyond Solar Home Systems

Solar rooftop PV, particularly solar home systems, are well established globally, including across rural communities in Asia. Some efforts to promote solar rooftop have been successful; however, others, especially in remote and island communities, face multiple technical problems, including lack of proper maintenance or materials replacement. This session will highlight approaches to scaling up solar rooftop PV in rural communities and will explore micro-grid and mini-grid configurations to provide economies of scale while ensuring reliable and adequate energy supply to power productive uses beyond household energy requirements.

The session will address the following questions:

  • How can we effectively scale up solar rooftop PV in rural communities?
  • What are the challenges and advantages of using microinverters, as well as integrating hybrid combinations (e.g., renewable energy with batteries or diesel back-up)?
  • What are the economic benefits and what job training is needed?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy and Poverty, Session 3: Innovative and Inclusive Microfinance for Renewable Energy

Energy access for poor rural communities is dependent on three core pillars: appropriate renewable energy technologies, effective distribution channels, and affordable financing. Microfinance institutions (MFIs), in partnership with pro-poor energy product suppliers, can offer financing and built-in distribution channels to their existing clients, most of whom are women. This session will highlight efforts to improve financial inclusion for energy access through microfinance and will discuss how investments in clean energy can improve productivity, create jobs, and enhance livelihoods for poor rural families, and especially for women.

The session will address the following questions:

  • How has the journey of MFIs evolved from financing solar lanterns to financing energy-efficient consumer durables and larger-scale assets for productive uses?
  • What are the successful business models for inclusive microfinance for renewable energy?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy and Poverty, Session 4: Innovating End-use Applications: Cooking, Cooling, Heating, and Industry

Rural poverty is almost synonymous with energy poverty—without access to modern energy services, there is little opportunity for economic advancement. Access to modern clean energy allows for more productive end uses, job creation, longer productive hours, and cleaner water and sanitation, among other benefits. This session will highlight experiences from across Asia in the use of renewable energy technologies in specific end-use applications, in households, and across development sectors.

 

The session will address the following questions:

  • How has energy access impacted stakeholders in the agriculture and farming, health care, water and sanitation, and community-based industries related to tourism and food processing?
  • What are the significant achievements in gender sensitivity and gender equality in energy use and management?
  • What are the economic benefits?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy and Poverty, Session 5: Future Energy for Transformational Change

Several tried-and-tested energy technologies have yet to be demonstrated in rural, SIDS and FCAS communities. This session will focus on advanced energy technologies, applications, practices and differentiated approaches targeting specific challenges of the poor and vulnerable in rural, SIDS countries and FCAS* .

The session will address the following questions:

  • How can we leverage technologies such as floating solar for ocean, salt-water and freshwater applications, including for deep-sea fishing; rooftop PV for irrigation canals; and solar pumping?
  • Can wave and tidal energy, and portable and mobile generation systems such as solar trucks, e-rickshaws and trikes reach underserved communities in far flung areas?
  • What are some of the best climate-smart practices from around the globe, including other developing regions such as Africa and Latin America?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?
* Countries in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Situations include most (9 out of 14) of ADB’s Pacific Developing Member Countries, as well as Afghanistan, Nepal, and Myanmar. For more information see here.

The Asia-Pacific region requires an investment of nearly $1.7 trillion per annum in the energy sector between 2016 and 2030[4]. However, the region’s clean energy sector attracted a total investment of only $166 billion in 2018, according to Bloomberg NEF. These numbers indicate that there is a massive financing gap between current practice and the resources needed to meet the region’s clean energy targets.

This track will draw on the experience of project developers, entrepreneurs, governments and investors from across Asia. It will also draw on the experience of ADB and other development partners in identifying new niches and areas where catalytic finance can make a difference—through the support of new technologies, business models, and financing tools and mechanisms.

Topics will include, but are not limited to, the role of the government in enabling private sector participation; in championing pioneering and cornerstone projects; and in the development of new and innovative approaches to financing clean energy projects. Case studies, including examples of regional cooperation, will be presented throughout the track.

Abstracts should address one of the topics listed below:

Finance, Session 1: Global Trends in the Financing of Clean Energy

Developing countries across the globe are making an aggressive push toward a low-carbon economy and have set national clean energy targets. However, to achieve their targets, they will require huge capital investments and innovative mechanisms to unlock new sources of financing. This session will discuss global trends covering emerging ways of doing business in financing green and clean energy infrastructure.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are the current trends in project financing?
  • What is the lender’s perspective, and how does this compare with the development imperative?
  • How can we mobilize private sector investment for clean energy to meet the significant infrastructure investment requirements of developing countries?
  • How can we address various issues such as standard power purchase agreements (PPAs) and problems related to bankability of the underlying transactions?
  • How can we deal with stranded assets (for example, for some less-efficient thermal plants, or for older renewable energy technologies that are far less economical than today’s options)?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Finance, Session 2: Role of Governments in Enabling the Financing of Clean Energy

Facilitating the region’s energy transition to a low-carbon economy will require innovative public finance mechanisms, particularly those that can be structured to leverage private sector financing. This session will discuss how the public sector can support the expansion and development of clean energy financing.  It will provide an overview of Green Public Procurement and how to scale up green financing, and will also review a recent report by the International Energy Agency (IEA)* which highlights the fact that 70% of energy infrastructure falls under public sector financing.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What financing instruments have been adopted by governments and inter-governmental agencies to support and enhance green infrastructure financing?
  • What blended financing and climate financing instruments are available (e.g., the Climate Investment Funds and the Green Climate Fund)?
  • How can we design effective tax incentives, carbon taxes, and other fiscal instruments and incentives?
  • What are the lessons learned from the following types of financing initiatives?
    - Sukuk (Islamic Bonds) for green finance
    - Sovereign backed green project bonds
    - Credit enhancement (IIFCL partial guarantee for credit enhancement in India)
    - US tax-exempt bonds
*IEA. World Energy Outlook 2018.

Finance, Session 3: Financing of Large-scale Renewable Energy Projects

As we continue to drive the clean energy transition, it is important to discuss how to finance large-scale renewable energy projects. This session will focus on best practices for financing of solar parks, floating solar projects, solar rooftop and residential solar business models, and battery storage and virtual power plants. The session will also discuss financing of successful offshore wind projects.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What types of financing mechanisms are currently available for large-scale renewable energy projects?
  • What changes in policies and regulatory frameworks are required to spur higher levels of investments into such projects?
  • How can project developers and investors structure investment models for large-scale projects that are burdened with additional costs related to transmission and interconnection, or ancillary construction costs, as in the case of offshore wind power?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Finance, Session 4: Crossing the “Valley of Death”: Impact and Venture Capital Investments in Early-stage Clean Energy Firms 

It is hard to cross the “Valley of Death” as an entrepreneur and to develop a company that can showcase positive results and demonstrate the ability to expand capacity to make impactful gains in the market place.  This session will highlight challenges and risks faced by start-up companies in the clean energy industry, and highlight examples of how to overcome these obstacles.

The session will address the following questions:

  • Why do clean entrepreneurs usually have difficulties acquiring capital?
  • What types of partnerships are needed between businesses, researchers and academia on the one hand and public sector organizations on the other?
  • How can typically conservative institutions with broader social objectives take more risk to support innovative companies?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Finance, Session 5: Risk Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction/Insurance in the Energy Sector

Reducing financing risks will often increase the chance for attracting additional investment. This session will discuss the importance of reducing the overall risk for investors and financial institutions that are investing in clean energy projects.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What types of green bonds, climate bonds and sustainability bonds are available?
  • What are the mitigation instruments for geothermal, mini-grids battery projects, and climate risk?
  • What types of insurance products are available to cover the performance risk for clean energy projects? Or to cover the increased risks of disasters related to climate change and extreme weather events and conditions?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Significant advances in clean energy are increasingly result from energy improved research and collaboration internationally, and throughout Asia. These advances help accelerate the deployment of clean energy technologies, by bringing down costs and improving operational efficiencies. Rapid advances in commercializing applications such as long-term energy storage and renewable heating and cooling are also needed to meet the Sustainable Development Goals and to go “beyond Paris.”

For the first time in 2019, ACEF is organizing a track that will highlight leading-edge research into new and innovative clean energy technologies and systems. This track will focus on identifying the market trends and technologies that are driving the clean energy revolution, their fundamental drivers and the outlook for the future.

Topics will include, but are not limited to, research in clean energy conversion technologies (including high value-added end uses); energy efficiency and renewable energy; energy management, policy, economics, and sustainability; energy storage; and intelligent energy systems. Case studies and examples of regional cooperation will be presented throughout the track.

Abstracts should address one of the topics listed below:

Energy Trends, Session 1: Novel PV Applications and Grid Parity

The global market for solar PV market is expected to grow by a dramatic 65-fold by 2050[5], due to technology innovations and policy incentives. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to, experiences and practices in PV development, incentives and policies, new business models and investment approaches, future PV technologies and applications, and new and emerging PV technologies.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are the emerging and future PV technologies and applications?
  • What are the innovative business models as the technology matures and continues to decrease in cost?
  • What is a practical roadmap to achieving more widespread grid parity, and what are the lessons learned to date from developed nations?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy Trends, Session 2: Bioenergy and Waste-to-Energy

With increased urbanization and rural development, waste generation and agriculture biomass will continue to increase at exponential rates. There are significant needs for solutions to convert waste products into valuable energy in a reliable, environmentally safe, and easy-to-implement way. This session will provide up-to-date information on technologies for extracting energy from waste products; new biomass conversion technologies; biochar from biomass and solid waste; gasification and pyrolysis; waste to biochemical products and materials; integrated system solutions for optimal use of bioenergy and waste, and examples of smart policies and incentives.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What are new technologies for bioenergy and waste-to-energy?
  • What enabling policy and regulatory frameworks are required to help scale up the market?
  • How can the challenges of cross-sector stakeholders (such as waste and energy governing bodies within municipalities) be effectively addressed?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

Energy Trends, Session 3: Ocean Energy in the 21st Century

While oceans have proved to be a promising source of clean energy, they have not gained popularity or become a mainstream source of renewable energy, as have wind and solar. The session will provide an overview on developments in commercializing ocean energy generation and related end-uses, such as offshore wind, marine floating solar, ocean biomass, in-stream tidal conversion, and cleaner marine propulsion.

The session will address the following questions:

  • Which existing ocean energy technologies are commercial or near commercial?
  • Which legal, economic, and social issues serve as key impediments to industry development?
  • How do you address the deployment of new technologies in remote locations and locations with low technical capacity for maintenance and repair?
  • How can we make ocean energy a mainstream source of renewable energy?

Energy Trends, Session 4: Renewable Heating, Cooling, and Storage

Nearly half of global final energy consumption is used for heating and cooling applications, including industrial processes. This offers a huge opportunity to tap renewable energy for heating and cooling households and industries.  Similarly, there is a need to leverage energy storage technologies beyond just batteries for electric vehicles. This session will examine various applications for high efficiency and renewable heating, cooling and storage and highlight recent developments.

The session will address the following questions:

  • What policy and regulatory mechanisms are required for the scale-up of such technologies?
  • How can we decarbonize heavy industries that traditionally rely on coal; and help meet, and go beyond the Paris goals?
  • What are recent developments in bio-based substitutes for coal, power to gas, low-carbon process heat (e.g., concentrating solar thermal power), geothermal district heating and cooling, thermal storage for seasonal time-shifting of renewable electricity, for non-electricity applications, and for space cooling with seawater?
  • What are the key challenges and success stories in the region?

[1] In June 2018, more than 1,300 professionals from 73 countries attended ACEF
[2] SDG 6 is Clean Water and Sanitation, and SDG 7 is Affordable and Clean Energy. See https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/
[3] Agriculture will need to produce 60% more food globally by 2050, and 100% more in developing countries, using diminishing water resources.
[4] ADB Report (Financing Asia’s Infrastructure Needs, 2017)
[5] https://eto.dnvgl.com/2018/